Thursday, September 11, 2008

Depression - the scourge of the 21st Century



I have to say this type of headline alarms me:- "Tas Premier sacks Wriedt".

The poor woman has been diagnosed with depression and the Premier has been forced to make a decision for not only the good of his Government but also the good of poor Ms Wreidt.

The complete quandary that she has found herself in is going to be extremely difficult for her to cope. I hope and pray that her family and friends can move closer to her right now to assist through this dilemma. Her job is something that she aspired too and for whatever reason her mind has succumbed to this horrible state that seems to be afflicting so many these days.

I look forward this year to "Movember" and will be supporting it aggressively as "Beyond Blue" will be a major benefactor. I do not think we understand "depression" at all well and have watched with interest as I see people cringe and pull away when the word is mentioned.

It is exactly the time when true friends and loved ones need to learn how to support these people.

The Premier of Tasmania did not sack her - he made a decision that will ultimately help. My heart reaches out to Ms Wreidt - fight the good fight my love.

5 comments:

Monique said...

The assumption that you're not sick because you don't look sick can apply here too. Late last year I had a breakdown and quit my job due to unbelievable amounts of stress and sickness. Some people just didn't understand why I couldn't work and what I was going through - I can't believe how little people know.. Depression in this society is almost as if you have to hide it as a social taboo which then results in suicides

JimBob51 said...

Exactly - right now the Lady will need love and understanding. The cruel headline will do very little to support this poor girl. Shame on the ABC Journalist - completely unsympathetic.

Shelley said...

It is unfortunate these days that depression seems a some what silent epidemic because people are too afraid to ask for help or they don't realise that they need it.

There is a sea out there with only the fingertips showing of people who are reaching out to be noticed and who need to be helped out of the dark pits.

I have known depression most of my life through my parents who are both clinically depressed and also my own bouts with depression. It is never an easy path back but one that is greatly helped with love and understanding.

Charlie Robinson said...

Depression and how we go about coping with it as a community is certainly an interesting topic... but if i take the issue broader we still don't really cope with anyone (in the fullest capacity) who is disabled. Depression is a disability. We have OH&S laws that help people rehabilitate through when they injure their arm, legs, back or other at work - why do we struggle when it is depression brought on by stress? Well, probably because there are so many other factors involved and it isn't quite so nice and black and white, cut and dry for our traditional world.

But I do think our traditional world is changing. The workforce (to attract people) is having to become far more family / well being / people friendly... and hopefully that will rub off.

In the future lets hope we see workplaces embrass people at all stages of their life and help them through. It is a micro-community after all and to perform well we need to look after each other.

Fingers crossed.
xc

Anonymous said...

I wish I could give Ms Wreidt a hug. What a devastating place to be- I hope she pulls through and has the strength and support to get back on her feet and into an equally challenging job again. I realised once I became clinically depressed in my 20s that my mum had been suffering from it all my childhood- but it was too late to take back all the resentment and neglect I had felt when I was too young to understand. Now I wonder whether people don't employ me these days because they know I suffer from depression or they're trying to spare me the stress? We all need to talk more, so things don't come to such a pass that it's too late to carry on. Take note Tasmanian public service...